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Level 4.4 Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

Written By Heni Puspita on Thursday, March 24, 2011 | 6:29 PM



One-syllable
adjectives

 old
wise
COMPARATIVE
older
wiser
SUPERLATIVE
the oldest
the wisest

For more one-syllable adjectives, -er and -est are added.

Two-syllable
adjectives


famous
pleasant

more famous
more pleasant

the most famous
the most pleasant

For more two-syllable adjectives, more and most are used.


busy
pretty

busier
prettier

the busiest
the prettiest

-Er and -est are used with two-syllable adjectives that end
in -y. The -y is changed to -i.


clever

gentle

friendly

cleverer
more clever
gentler
more gentle
friendlier
more friendly

the cleverest
the most clever
the gentlest
the most gentle
the friendliest
the most friendly

Some two-syllable adjectives use
either -er/-est or more/most:
able, angry, clever, common, cruel,
friendly, gentle, handsome, narrow,
pleasant, polite, quiet, simple, sour.

Adjectives
with three
or more
syllables

important

fascinating

more important

more fascinating

the most important
the most fascinating

More and most are used with long adjectives.

Irregular
adjectives

good
bad

better
worse

the best
the worst

Good and bad have irregular comparative and superlative forms.
Both farther and further are used to compare physical distances:
I walked farther/further than my friend did.
Further (but not farther) can also mean “additional”:
I need further information.

Source: 
Picture - Reuploaded by me, original picture HERE.

Fundamental of English Grammar 3rd Edition, Betty Azar (2003).

2 komentar:

Ladida Cafe said...

You explain it well, btw i love the picture, it's so funny but related with the post :)

Heni Puspita said...

Thank you so much :)

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